Crown of the Continent Research Learning Center

mountain goats on cliffgrizzly bearbear grassculturally scarred treecitizen scientists conducting a survey

The Crown of the Continent Research Learning Center promotes research and scientific understanding within the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem. By facilitating research and communicating current scientific activities within Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, Grant-Kohrs Ranch and Little Bighorn Battlefield, we hope to encourage informed decision making, science literacy and resource stewardship.

This web site provides in-depth information on natural and cultural research and resource issues within the Crown of the Continent and surrounding parks. Learn more about specific topics by exploring the links on the left or visit the parks pages to discover the unique natural and cultural resources each park has to offer.

 

What's New?

  • Glacier National Park and the Hockaday Museum of Art in Kalispell worked together to bring a national art exhibit, entitled Piecing Together a Changing Planet: Climate Change in America’s National Parks, to the Hockaday Museum. The show will run from July 30 through September 12, 2015 and features twenty-six art quilts created by 22 Florida artists. The quilts were created to highlight climate change effects happening throughout our national parks. The exhibit has shown at two previous national parks and will be shown at seven more locations across the country.

    Yale University is featuring Piecing Together a Changing Planet on their "Climate Connections" radio program, including an episode featuring Glacier, entitled
    "More than Melting Glaciers." The White House has used the exhibition as an example of how the National Park Service is providing climate change education.
  • Interested in learning about climate change impacts in Glacier National Park? Check out a new park brochure on climate change and its affects on Glacier and the surrounding area.

  • Watch our new, beautifully produced video on harlequin ducks! The video, produced by Montana State University graduate student Christi Cooper, highlights a three-year harlequin duck research project in Glacier National Park.